Arizona State Tree

The Arizona state tree is the Palo Verde. Palo Verde is Spanish for “inexperienced pole” or “inexperienced stick.”, and refers back to the tree’s greenish branches and trunk. The spelling of the tree’s widespread title varies from “paloverde” to “palo verde”, however “palo verde” is the most typical.

Arizona State Tree

Arizona grew to become a state in 1912 however the Arizona state tree was formally adopted in 1954, launched to the Twenty-first Legislature of Arizona by 11 completely different ladies residing in six completely different Arizona counties. It is fascinating to notice that the laws that adopted the palo verde tree didn’t specify a specific selection. The Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 41, Chapter 4.1, Article 5, Part 41-856 is titled “State tree” and easily states that “The Palo Verde (genera cercidium) shall be the state tree.”

Arizona State Tree

Two Palo Verde species are native to Arizona. The Cercidium floridum has blue-green branches and leaves, and is usually known as the Blue Palo Verde. The Cercidium microphyllum has yellow-green branches and leaves, and is usually known as the Yellow or Foothill Palo Verde. Each species of palo verde are spiny, multi-trunked, deciduous bushes. Yellow palo verde bushes attain about 20 toes in top and have extra yellowish bark and duller yellow/white flowers. Blue palo verdes, however, can develop as tall as 40 toes. Their branches and leaves are bluish-green and are bigger than the yellow palo verde.

Arizona State Tree

Palo verde bushes are flowering bushes in Arizona that bloom within the spring. Throughout their quick flowering seasons, each species produce 1000’s of five-petaled yellow blossoms which magnetize numerous pollinating bugs together with bees, beetles, and even flies.

Arizona State Tree

The blue palo verde tree requires probably the most water of the 2 species, and is discovered most frequently in washes and different areas with larger water availability and finer soil. The yellow palo verde tree requires much less water, and is discovered most frequently in coarser soils on larger floor away from washes. Yellow palo verdes usually dwell over 100 years and will attain as much as 400 years of age, whereas blue palo verdes develop sooner and die sooner, hardly ever reaching even 100 years.